Confessing Christ Bloggers
Author: Richard L. Floyd Created: 7/3/2008 10:20 AM
In this theology blog we will hear from Christian thinkers ancient and modern, who love Christ and his church, and honor the rich ecumenical traditions of the great church, along with my own reflections. Responses are encouraged. I also blog at: http://richardlfloyd.blogspot.com/

By Richard L. Floyd on 9/10/2010 10:54 AM

In the days before the Internet and the 24/7 new cycle the announcement by an obscure Florida pastor that his church would be burning copies of the Koran might have attracted a column inch in the back pages of The Gainesville Daily Register, or get picked up as a nutty bit of ephemera by Paul Harvey.

No longer. Terry Jones has had his 15 days of celebrity, outraged pretty much everybody, and been addressed by the President of the United States, among other dignitaries.

Jones has also managed to convince inflammatory Republicans that there actually can be a fire too far. That anybody or anything could even momentarily unite the gladiators on both sides of the culture wars is worthy of note.

What particularly interests me is how new technologies reshape the way Christian faith is perceived.
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By Richard L. Floyd on 8/31/2010 3:09 PM

UCC Theologian Donald Bloesch died a week ago at the age of 82. His friend and colleague Gabriel Fackre paid tribute to him in Christianity Today and commented that he was “underappreciated in his lifetime.”

The United Church of Christ, certainly never paid him much heed. Fackre said, “Don was never given the recognition due to him in the UCC because he was a feisty critic of the liberal establishment. We both were doing our best in the United Church of Christ to call it back to its original ecumenical vision.”
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By Richard L. Floyd on 6/4/2010 8:41 AM

More and more of my ministerial friends and colleagues seem to be in trouble with their congregations these days. I'm not talking about issues of clergy misconduct, just a breaking down of the trusting relationship between pastor and people. Here are some thoughts: Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 3/26/2010 8:58 AM

At which end of Jesus’ life should we look for the reason we call him “Lord and Savor?” My friends in the Mercersburg Society put heavy stress on the Incarnation. Others, such as P. T. Forsyth, insist that we only can understand the Incarnation backwards in time, from the perspective of Christ’s death and resurrection.

From Gabriel Fackre, one of the early and still best narrative theologians, I have learned to be careful not to take any episode of the story to represent the whole.
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By Richard L. Floyd on 3/13/2010 6:12 PM

If you were to worship in an American conservative evangelical church that hasn’t yet sold its soul to the prosperity Gospel, there is a good chance you may soon hear a sermon about the cross. Not so in many Mainline churches. I have been wondering why this is, given the cross' important place in the New Testament, especially in Paul’s writings, of which the Epistle Lesson appointed for tomorrow, 2 Corinthians 5:16-2, is a prime example. Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 3/10/2010 9:52 AM

We all come before God with empty hands, with nothing to show but our sins, and still God the heavenly Father, like the earthly father in the parable, has been waiting and watching for us all along. Is such love fair? Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 3/6/2010 9:12 AM

The Psalm appointed for this Sunday (tomorrow, actually) is Psalm 55, one of my (many) favorites. For those of us who have earned our bread as theologians and ministers of the church, and who sometimes assume an unhealthy knowledge and familiarity with the ways of God, there is a word here we need to hear again and again: Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 3/1/2010 2:22 PM

Too many of our new pastors in the mainline church leave the ministry after a few years. There are many reasons why this happens, but for whatever reason, it is not good. Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 2/14/2010 9:21 AM

The great British theologian P.T. Forsyth often complained that the church was guilty of the “sin of bustle,” by running errands for the culture at the expense of its own unique vocation. Perhaps preachers are the guiltiest of them all when it comes to this, as they stop attending to their high calling of preaching. Here's Richard Lischer's cogent take on what too often happens to preaching today: Read More »

By Richard L. Floyd on 2/13/2010 10:23 AM

You Won't Despise a Broken Heart Read More »

   
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